2 Engineers, 1 website.

 

Financial Jiu Jitsu will teach you how to gain leverage in the real world, step by step, until you are confident you no longer need more.

Want to finish on time? Start early

Want to finish on time? Start early

I am always astounded at how late everything is. Tires take extra time to mount, Smog test takes an hour to perform, meetings almost always start 15 mins after the bell, 8AM turns into 8:18 every day. DMV trips turn into the nightmare on elm street the extended director cut version with dialogue. On the weekends you stay out till 3AM and don't wake up till noon even though you had lots of things to do that morning, and by the time you are ready to go run errands all the stores are closed. You go to do a single thing on your car and end up needing to stop the project to order something else that was broke along the way (dang corvettes.)

Occasionally you may even finish something early or it will take less time than you thought, but that only demonstrates your ignorance of the subject at hand because you didn't estimate it correctly again, although this time you were sooner rather than later in completion. When you miss high it still counts as a miss. 

Yes this is a financial website, but like Abraham Lincoln said right after he cut down that apple tree;

timemoneylincoln

Time is money after all. So get better at using it.  

Now instead of wandering through life with an endless list of tasks that never get done and being late all the time and being a drag in most social gatherings, I encourage you to open up your mind region to receive inside a tiny bit of reality from our FJJ site:

Want to finish on time? Then Start early!

I have a cool example of this that is currently going on and is the driving force for this article. It so rarely happens but at this moment I have a multi step project with a deadline that actually matters. You guys all remember the time I bought the Corvette. Interestingly enough this car was purchased as a training wheel vehicle so to speak. With no traction control or ABS, no weight in the back, and plenty of torque this is the perfect car to learn to drive with. The early C4's are notorious for being difficult and fun to drive at the same time, and with no electronic nanny behind you, you always have to pay attention to what you are doing in a very micro-manager style manner. 

You need to be a master mechanic to daily drive this car by the way

You need to be a master mechanic to daily drive this car by the way

Now my friend who shall remain nameless for his personal privacy (Jacob) finally got me to sign up for a track day over at Laguna Seca. You have to register months in advance and pay good money for a slot. So once you schedule a track day you have to ensure that your car is ready at all costs. No random overheating, leaks, cracked tires, etc. It has to have plenty of brakes left and high boiling temp brake fluid to replace the 1985 brake fluid (water.) You need a helmet. You need to install a tow hook. Oh crap and you need to go on vacation for a week and you only have a couple more weeks to finish the car before its time to run it!

This is an example of a task that you will want to complete on time. Not like a work related thing which can be excusable if it ends up a bit late and really nobody will hold it against you. This is actually important to you

There are various stratagem in use to keep me on schedule here. The first one is the one mentioned above. Start early. As soon as I signed up for the track day, I started scrounging Craigslist for wheels and tires and ordered the fancy ATE brake fluid. This paid off because it took me an entire 2 weeks to find and procure a set of rims that I actually wanted and would fit and perform well. Then after trying them on I found out that I needed 1" spacers in the rear which are fairly common on Ebay for cheap but will add another 3 days before a real road test. Then after a test drive I decided to swap the rear tires for something that would actually survive an entire day of track in the hot hot sun. First place I ordered the tires from cancelled 2 days after I ordered. So I was saved by ordering from Summit racing the 2nd time and they gave me 1 day shipping FOR FREE so I got them all buttoned up last weekend and got some miles on the road. That new-tire-glaze came off almost too easy and had me worried for a second or two. Now it hugs like it should I noticed the Mickey Thompson Street Comp tires are hard when cold and reasonable ductile when warm. This is a good reality check for the track maybe I will do some burnouts first. I am still not 100% ready though, and I have things to do.  

What you need to tackle a project like this is a sweet program called google keep to keep you on track. Here is a screenshot of my ongoing keep project for the car:

Makin a list, checking it twice, lalalalalala lalalala

Makin a list, checking it twice, lalalalalala lalalala

As you can see I have completed many of the tasks I set out to, and had I clicked the boxes in keep it would have dropped the tasks to a lower level and they would look like this:

geez i guess I have done quite a bit.....

geez i guess I have done quite a bit.....

Of course google keep links to your google account which you of course have. If you don't have a google account get one, I guarantee they already know more about you than you do yourself so just give in. Besides the keep program, google has a decent calendar and offers google drive which is a must have for anybody with an android phone. I have found that having all of these functions related and synchronized makes me a much more productive person. These tools enable the elusive multitasking without forgetting things ability, which all people inherently lack. Also, it is cool to note that the keep program allows you to add pictures and live links inside the app so you never have to forget where you saw anything just like an elephant. 

Now back to the project at hand. You say well why didn't you just start on time and finish on time? Reality check bro, things come up. In my above example I needed 1" spacers on the rear of the car. I wouldn't have known that unless I had bought and installed the rims first. I could have guessed, but that is just an invitation for getting the wrong size. Technically this was an unforeseen delay costing 2 or 3 days for spacer shipping. Also, I had to order tires two times waiting 2 days in between. Another unforeseen delay of about 3 days. And now that I have come this far, I am watching one of the brake reservoirs and believe it may be leaking down slowly, with no evidence of extra fluid loss at the caliper, so this could turn into a big fix if I feel the need to do it before track day. Needless to say I am watching that reservoir daily and may spring into action this weekend to replace whatever it is causing the leak if I deem it necessary to ensure my safety and speed readiness. 

Already a simple project of about one month has produced 6 days of late parts and extra time. It may turn out to be even more when all is said and done. Add in a vacation in the middle and it could easily spell a track disaster. The only way I was able to get even this far was to start early in anticipation of extra tasks springing up. Had I begun the project "on time," I would have been headed to track day with cracked rock-hard tires on 16" rims, and I would not have even had a chance to properly diagnose the brake line leak issue that I currently suspect. We all have a few friends who would show up to the track in exactly this predicament, who would blame the car for all of their personal shortcomings. All the while you listen and inside your head you say to yourself: dude it's not rocket science just put the rims on and fix the problems. All you do is burn weed all weekend you had time to anticipate these things and be ready.

Don't be that person, be a real bro and finish on time.  

Don't be that person, be a real bro and finish on time.  

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Making the First and Second Million in the Silicon Age

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